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There is a saying that goes… “If you want to get something done, do it yourself.”

Short reflective answer, Yes, it’s true!

Early last week, I dared myself to write a repeat email to a library in the land of the free. I wanted to secure an overseas membership, as I wanted to gain access to a particular website that would rekindle my desire and fear to re-learn programming from scratch. Ah yes, a creative guy who only gets visual stuff wants to code again for real.

I of course was elated with overwhelming joy when I was granted unconditional access. You thought I had won the lottery. Finally! A door wedged open. You could say that I’m learning a new language. Actually, it is my desire to learn multiple languages and web technologies. HTML 5 and CSS 3 are two of the foundational basics.

It also marks a second crucial website where I can learn from on-demand videos in the latest technologies and digital trends. If these options were available to me before I finished high school, I honestly wouldn’t have bothered with university.

I am glad I did do university in the end… otherwise, I would never have become a born-again Christian in the LORD Jesus Christ.

So yeah, I desire to re-learn ALL of my current skillset from scratch (again) because I may find myself become a teacher (or leader) to others, but more crucially I want to learn how things work. And since I have signed off, I can re-focus my time on achievable goals without external pressures. I just pray I still remain sane and assured in in the LORD Jesus Christ.

Looking back in the early years of web development, you only needed one person to code a website. The web technologies back then was simply HTML and CSS. Remember the days when you had to add tags using the likes of <i>Italic</i> or <b>bold</b>?

In fact, when I was a student, I even copied the layout of a popular Christian bands website to adopt and use for our Christian Union society at university. Yes, I know… how ironic!

The point was, I wanted to see if I could learn backwards from those working in the industry. My theory worked. I was also fortunate enough to secure side projects, and even work on my university’s intranet for the ICT department.

Fast forward time, and my skills are so dated that I lost confidence in pursuing my love for web design. I was confused by web standards, the ever-changing trends in web compliance among web browsers, and how to code from scratch with confidence using only Notepad.

At the time of writing, I have already finished a web programming course called “How to Make a Website.” It may sound like a newbie course, and I thought it would be the same recycled content used in free programming courses like Codecademy, but no! In fact, there is so much information to digest that the tutor even explained why such web element exists, and the concept behind hexadecimal values, etc. I have never grown so confident in learning a new language in such a short space of time. I also like how they build you slowly to create a fully complex website as your first project, especially when it is their passion and desire for you to grow in your skillset, where they hope you can secure a job as a web developer.

All I can say is that HTML 5 and CSS 3 is really nifty to work with, and so far, I have only touched on the basics. And no, I am not doing a dramatic u-turn to pursue a career as a web developer. It’s not my calling.

Nonetheless, for me, it will help me in three areas.

1. To develop a technical and practical working knowledge in current and trending web technologies from HTML to Ruby.

2. To grow in securing soft contracts for the “fake business” relating to web projects.

3. To use the latest technologies for the benefit of this Kingdom-focused vision.

~Richard