Last month, I have decided to shift around my finances like a magician hiding a red ball between one of three cups. Ah… the classic tricks are the best. Sometimes I feel life is a bit like an Abra-ca-da-bra, except we neither know the underlying outcome or reason behind such conventional routine.

Anyhow…

I have recently signed up for an arranged overdraft. Strangely, I qualify for a ridiculous overdraft of £2000. However, I stuck with my gut and original decision to apply only for a £300 overdraft, which I hope to reserve for rare and unexpected bills that may filter through my account before I get paid.

“Bills I hear you say Richard? But you live with your parents. What bills?”

Bills for me consists of magazine subscriptions, 10-weekly bus passes, two web hosts (one is shared, the other is a virtual private server for development purposes), and a clustered domain portfolio.

The latter being fairly on the high end, as I also purchase the WhoisGuard for each domain, which in layman’s terms is simply a privacy add-on feature that prevents one’s personal contact details from appearing on the Whois Domain registrars and search queries. It just means if someone is now interested to purchase a domain name that I hold, they can’t call me by name, but rather, I will be addressed with a ‘Hey Mister!’

I have also started doing various standing orders on my own accounts. I now force a select amount to disappear from my primary account to other accounts… like magic! It helps my brain to work towards a 2-figure sum for 30 days to act all frugal, until the next pay day. I have been debt free since the summer of 2007 and I wish to remain debt free by the time I marry. From then on, I know I will be signing onto debt due to a mortgage on a house to cater for a wife and a mini-me (or two… or three).

I also strive to cash out a lump saving to an external account for obvious reasons. Purely for the sake of saving money, which in my circumstance is a blessing because of the fact that I live with my folks. And despite me offering to pay the odd bill here and there, my parents outrightly refuse. I don’t abuse their love and grace towards me, but I do my fair share to help around the house. According to several Koreans, I would make a fantastic house husband. As Elvis Presley famously said in return with his tilted lips, ’Thank you very much.’

The Root of Money

So yes. I am able to jettison a stockpile of savings on my mediocre salary without paying out on real bills and mortgages. However, I yearn to acquire extra money, either through an alternative job that pays a higher salary or through creative and modern mediums.

I have lately considered investing in either graphics cards for crypto mining, but I would rather drop a good investment on crypto mining hardware… if only the demand wasn’t so outrageous worldwide. I know the underlying blockchain technology is here to stay, but do I trust parting my hard-earned dosh to the Chinese who are in fact making a ludicrous amount of REAL money in creating tech for crypto mining, thus fingering the market in virtual currencies. And indeed the nature of cryptocurrencies generates a volatile market that is more holistic than the spodaric nature of my digestive system to generate a euphoric trouser cough. The irony of virtual currencies is why aren’t Silicon Valley developing the underlying tech for the Western nations, but China?

The reason for considering crypto mining is to secure another source of income to invest or sell. I have juggled the power usage and I still believe the commercial mining hardware offer a better ROI (Return On Investment) than the avenue of depleted stock of affordable graphics cards. However, the latter will see a soft profit after a given year. The sad reality is that I’m not interested in a soft profit, but a hard profit.

Faith-Driven Finances

It’s stupid to think back in my younger years as a believer that I was confidently naive to trust in the LORD to provide for my financial needs. I had a child-like faith that my £12k-14k student loans would be paid off, that He would provide a part-time job to afford my tuition fees for 6 years, whilst believing in God that He will look after me, as I prepared to let go of my part-time job in 2014.

Fast forward to a semi-comfortable job earning less than £19k per annum and I am reluctant to step out in faith all of a sudden.

I feel ridiculously guilty in my Spirit and hopeless for allowing myself to slide into a state of complacent faith. On the surface, folk see me as calm and collective – even in times of tribulation and profound environments of stress, but inside – I feel like a combusted volcano waiting to erupt. It’s sadly a non-worthy skill that I perfect in confiding, as I don’t want to burden those around me.

The comical thing is that even if I did earn extra money, I still wouldn’t be happy, as I would be annoyed by the 20% tax that is deducted from my higher salary. Sadly, we will never see that 18.5% tax rate. I get why folk chase the get-rich quick schemes. If it’s no YouTube videos screaming and playing games or commenting on cosmetics for a living, it’s bloomin’ Bitcoin mining. At the end of the day, I am categorised as a Millennial, even though I mostly live my life like I’m not.

I shall rest my brain from worry. Besides, I still have much to skill-up. As I jot down notes for this Kingdom-focus vision, with multiple sheets of A4 scattered across my study desk like a dog’s dinner, I also want to stay abreast in the latest technologies to earn a living. Of course, me developing my skillset in ICT only enhances the superficial value of my human knowledge and understanding of the business infrastructure from an ICT perspective.

As for my faith. Curiously, I ask the LORD God daily to help me grow in my faith, and I still ask Him daily for Godly wisdom, Godly knowledge and Godly guidance. Perhaps I need to stretch my faith to better multi-task with the limited time that I have and allow the LORD to provide, as I seek to return in a child-like faith.

~Richard